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What to watch out for on Twitter this morning

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Here’s what to watch this morning as the Australian Government’s new speed mining law kicks in: *It’s all about Twitter, the social media giant that has helped Australians to build a community of millions of followers.

But it also has the potential to become a battleground for the Government’s opposition.

The bill has attracted criticism from human rights groups and others for allowing the use of the social networking site to gather information on suspected criminals, including those accused of murder.

But that criticism is largely based on the fact that the legislation does not require companies to disclose how they process information.

*The legislation also does not specify how long data can be retained, which could affect privacy rights and freedom of expression.

*It does not allow for the retention of data for more than a certain period of time, which is also a problem.

*And the legislation provides for penalties for breaches.

For example, if a company violates the new legislation it could be fined $1,000 per day or imprisoned for up to six months.

It could also be fined a maximum of $50,000 for each day it fails to comply.

*What to watch for on social media This morning, Twitter users will be under a barrage of messages and Tweets that will tell them to stay away from the company’s social media services and its own account.

They will also see the following messages: *”We have been alerted to a potential breach of our privacy policy which has been resolved” *”The information you have provided has been deleted.

Please contact us to obtain a copy of the data” *And “Please note that your information is not being shared with anyone outside the Australian Federal Police or the Department of Communications and Media.”

But this is just the tip of the iceberg, according to privacy lawyer Paul Dyson.

*”It could potentially be used to target people based on their ethnicity, gender or religious affiliation, with very little justification.” “

In the end, this means that even if you’re not a person of interest, your information may be released to other organisations,” Mr Dyson said.

*”It could potentially be used to target people based on their ethnicity, gender or religious affiliation, with very little justification.”

*AAP/ABC NewsTopics:internet-culture,technology,internet-policy,technology-and-communication,sri-lanka,australiaMore stories from Victoria

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